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Water Supply

On May 9, 2016, Governor Brown issued an Executive Order directing the State Water Resources Control Board to “adjust and extend” emergency water conservation regulations through January of 2017. As part of the adjustments to the regulation, the State has done away with mandated conservation standards that were previously assigned to water districts.  In lieu of mandated standards, the State has implemented a process for water providers to self-certify that they have enough water supply to meet customer demand in the event that the state experiences an additional three years of drought conditions.   On June 22, 2016, the City of Hemet Water Department submitted a Self-Certification of Supply Reliability.  Based on the results of each districts self-certification, the State will assign a new conservation standard to each water district.  The City of Hemet has self-certified supply in excess of the demand projected for the next three years.  Information and analysis provided by the City to the State Water Resources Control Board is required to be posted to a publicly accessible webpage and can be accessed by clicking the link below.

      City of Hemet Water Supply-Worksheets 1-6
         Worksheet 1-Water Supply Sources
         Worksheet 2-Groundwater Supplies
         Worksheet 3-Base Production Calculations
         Worksheet 4-Monthly Well Water Levels Feb 2013
         Worksheet 5-Monthly Well Water Levels Apr 2016
         Worksheet 6-Groundwater Safe Yield Levels

      Fact Sheet: New Local Emergency Water Conservation Efforts


The City of Hemet Water Department relies on local groundwater as the only water supply source for customers in its 5.25 square mile service area.  Groundwater is currently pumped from the Hemet Groundwater basin by nine City-owned wells.

The City has water exchange service connections with EMWD and LHMWD, which provides an opportunity for water exchanges during emergency situations.  


Fresh water supplies are often limited, whether by availability or a system’s capacity to supply and treat water. Southern California typically faces challenges in meeting the summer demand, especially in times of drought, and Hemet is no different. As the population continues to grow, demand for water stresses our already limited water supplies. It is in our best interest as a community to engage in and promote clean water protection and conservation practices.

California DROUGHT—With California facing one of the most severe droughts on record, Governor Brown declared a drought State of Emergency in January 2014 and directed state officials to take all necessary actions to prepare for water shortages. Find out more about how California is coping with this unprecedented drought at


Urban Water Management Plans are prepared by California's urban water suppliers to support their long-term resource planning and ensure adequate water supplies are available to meet existing and future water demands.  The CITY OF HEMET 2015 URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN was adopted by the Hemet city Council on June 14, 2016. 


The stakeholders in the Hemet/San Jacinto Groundwater Management Area have developed the Hemet/San Jacinto Water Management Plan to provide a foundation that guides and supports responsible water management in the future.  The local stakeholders involved in the Plan include Eastern Municipal Water District (EMWD), Lake Hemet Municipal Water District (LHMWD), City of Hemet, City of San Jacinto, and Private Water Producers.